Get Well Soon, Staten Island

The effects of Hurricane Sandy are still being felt across the tri-state area. Photographer Giles Clarke, a British expat and good friend of Tea & Sympathy, has been documenting the extent of the devastation on Staten Island. His moving pictures show how people need to remain strong and look out for one another. Our thoughts are with everyone who didn’t make it through the storm as easily as us.

Staten Island in Ruins: Photos by Giles Clarke

Via Dangerous Minds.

“What I saw in Staten Island a couple of days ago will never leave me. I was in areas that had seen no responders or emergency services and local residents were going about the business of clearing up and dealing with the shock.”

“I hope my pictures convey the terrible scale of the storm but also have a beauty that might signify the coming together of the human spirit in this very difficult time.”

 

Waiting for dry ice.

 

How high the waters rose.

 

There are many ways to contribute to the clear up effort. For more information go here.

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Some NY Sandy Images

Sean went for a walk around town with his camera yesterday. Crazy, eery, and yet still almost moving – we never thought we’d see New York City like this.

14th St & 8th Ave. Like a dolls house or something from a silent movie.

These striking images were captured looking up 7th Avenue. The light you can see in the distance is Times Square.

Come On Dover! Move Yer Bloomin’ …

Here is Audrey – Nicky and Sean’s daughter – bringing a little grace, eloquence and charm to Halloween with her portrayal of her namesake Audrey Hepburn in the movie My Fair Lady.

She makes an adorable little Eliza Doolittle – until she opens her mouth that is!

Here’s the horse race scene from the 1964 film, with Ms Hepburn uttering the immortal line in the iconic dress:

And lastly, given recent weather events it might be worth a quick reminder of just where exactly the rain in Spain might happen to stay:

Such a lovely movie!!!

British food takes Manhattan

We’re part of a movement here at Tea & Sympathy. Food and lifestyle journalist Katy Salter interviewed Nicky as an expat bringing the best of British food to Manhattan.

From lovefood.com

With Sean’s black cab sitting outside, and the interiors covered in nostalgic memorabilia, from regal teapots to signed photos of the EastEnders cast, this small block is New York’s own little Britain. ‘I don’t miss much about the UK,’ says Nicky ‘but I do miss M&S food. It’s the first place I go when I land at the airport – I love the lemon curd yoghurt and ham and mustard sandwiches.’ But neither can hold a candle to Nicky’s famous fluffy scones, served with proper clotted cream and jam. Her cream teas and other classic British dishes have won Tea and Sympathy legions of loyal regulars and celeb fans like Jake Gyllenhaal and Mila Kunis.

‘Americans think British food is mush and overcooked meat, and that just isn’t true’ says Nicky, who grew up in London and moved to New York in the early 80s. Rave reviews for Tea and Sympathy and Assault and Battery have helped changed those perceptions, as have the 1000s of cuppas poured by Tea and Sympathy’s British waitresses over the years. ‘I’ve single-handedly turned New Yorkers on to good tea,’ says Nicky, who hopes her new range of Tea and Sympathy teas will encourage even more Americans to enjoy the pleasures of a proper brew.

You can read the full piece here.

GO SEE: Stateside Spots for British Fare

The kind folk from the fantastic Laura Ashley Blog did a lovely post about their favorite English eating places in New York. Guess who was featured?! We love the photos and we’ll take their compliments about our food, but the interior design too? We’re in heaven!

The Great British Summer is coming to a close but not so are our cravings for English fare. Thankfully, a few stateside chums are satisfying our longings by catering to the tastes of home.

Our lunch favourite is Tea and Sympathy, where the menu of the traditional British kind defies any notion that the nation’s food is blasé and includes bangers ‘n mash, shepherd’s pie, welsh rarebit, roast beef with Yorkshire pudding and more. The setting– a delightful interpretation of a quintessential English corner in the heart of Greenwich Village– is cosy and eclectic with an assortment of mismatched china for tea service that is just simply charming.

Founded by the able hands of south London native Nicky Perry, Tea & Sympathy serves up an ample British plate and cuppa for our homesick bellies.

Nicky Perry delights in her heritage and it’s seen in the details. Guests can pick up a British newspaper, browse the shop for take home teas, sweets, and gifts, or schedule a special delivery by way of an authentic London cab. Tea & Sympathy is a must try for all, especially culinary starved Brits.

You can read the full post here, along with more lovely photos.

What was it like to be Queen Mum?

We have a very special Royal Roundup for you this week: a glimpse at the Queen Mother’s moving and cheerful thoughts about her life at the heart of the British Establishment. Extracts from ‘Counting One’s Blessings’ – private letters and journals from all 10 decades of her life – were published this week to mark the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee.

British royals (from left foreground) Queen Elizabeth, Princess Elizabeth, Princess Margaret and King George VI after his coronation in 1937.

Via The Daily Telegraph.

The letters reveal her dilemma over whether to marry the Duke of York, who later became king. In January 1923, following a three-year courtship by the Duke, the then Elizabeth Bowes Lyon wrote to one of her closest friends of feeling “terrified” at the prospect of marrying into the Royal family, having finally accepted the Duke’s proposal.

They also reveal her subsequent blissful enjoyment of marriage and motherhood, including many letters in which she writes affectionately of her young daughters, Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret Rose.

In a letter to Anne Beevers, her midwife and maternity nurse, written in October 1926 when Princess Elizabeth was six months old, she described her firstborn daughter as “sharp as a needle”.

Another letter to her mother, Lady Strathmore, written the same month, said: “She is going to be very wicked, and she is very quick I think …”

In 1936, following her sudden elevation to Queen Consort after Edward VIII abdicated to marry the American divorcee Wallis Simpson, Queen Elizabeth wrote to her brother-in-law that she and her husband were “overcome with misery” at being unexpectedly thrust on to the throne.

The letters also convey her heartbreak at the untimely death of her husband in February 1952, following a battle with lung cancer. In a letter to her mother-in-law, Queen Mary, she wrote of her devastation at losing “Bertie”, who she described as “my whole life”.

Read More Here.